Homographs are words of like spelling but with more than one meaning. A homograph that is also pronounced differently is a heteronym. You think English is easy?

In our current condition and context of ‘the digital age,’ we must focus on KEYWORDS to be found in job search, identified as a Prime Vendor, located as an ‘old friend,’ or even called on as a Subject Matter Expert.  Stay with me now, I think a retired English teacher was bored…THIS IS GREAT!

Read all the way to the end…This took a lot of work to put together!
1) The bandage was wound around the wound.

2) The farm was used to produce produce.

3) The dump was so full that it had to refuse more refuse.

4) We must polish the Polish furniture.

5) He could lead if he would get the lead out.

6) The soldier decided to desert his dessert in the desert.

7) Since there is no time like the present, he thought it was time to present the present.

8) A bass was painted on the head of the bass drum.

9) When shot at, the dove dove into the bushes.

10) I did not object to the object.

11) The insurance was invalid for the invalid.

12) There was a row among the oarsmen about how to row.

13) They were too close to the door to close it.

14) The buck does funny things when the does are present.

15) A seamstress and a sewer fell down into a sewer line.

16) To help with planting, the farmer taught his sow to sow.

17) The wind was too strong for me to wind the sail.

18) Upon seeing the tear in the painting I shed a tear..

19) I had to subject the subject to a series of tests.

20) How can I intimate this to my most intimate friend?

*** This is exhausting ***

Let’s face it – English is a crazy language. There is no egg in eggplant, nor ham in hamburger; neither apple nor pine in pineapple. English muffins weren’t invented in England or French fries in France .. Sweetmeats are candies while sweetbreads, which aren’t sweet, are meat. We take English for granted. But if we explore its paradoxes, we find that quicksand can work slowly, boxing rings are square and a guinea pig is neither from Guinea nor is it a pig.
And why is it that writers write but fingers don’t fing, grocers don’t groce and hammers don’t ham? If the plural of tooth is teeth, why isn’t the plural of booth, beeth? One goose, 2 geese. So one moose, 2 meese? One index, 2 indices? Doesn’t it seem crazy that you can make amends but not one amend? If you have a bunch of odds and ends and get rid of all but one of them, what do you call it?

If teachers taught, why didn’t preachers praught? If a vegetarian eats vegetables, what does a humanitarian eat? Sometimes I think all the English speakers should be committed to an asylum for the verbally insane. In what language do people recite at a play and play at a recital? Ship by truck and send cargo by ship? Have noses that run and feet that smell?

How can a slim chance and a fat chance be the same, while a wise man and a wise guy are opposites? You have to marvel at the unique lunacy of a language in which your house can burn up as it burns down, in which you fill in a form by filling it out and in which, an alarm goes off by going on.

English was invented by people, not computers, and it reflects the creativity of the human race, which, of course, is not a race at all. That is why, when the stars are out, they are visible, but when the lights are out, they are invisible.

PS. – Why doesn’t ‘Buick’ rhyme with ‘quick’?

*** Pause for a breath ***

You true lovers of the English language might enjoy this.
There is a two-letter word that perhaps has more meanings than any other two-letter word, and that is ‘UP.’

It’s easy to understand UP, meaning toward the sky or at the top of the list, but when we awaken in the morning, why do we wake UP?

At a meeting, why does a topic come UP?

Why do we speak UP and why are the officers UP for election and why is it UP to the secretary to writeUP a report?

We call UP our friends.

And we use it to brighten UP a room, polish UP the silver; we warm UP the leftovers and clean UP the kitchen.

We lock UP the house and some guys fix UP the old car.

At other times the little word has real special meaning.

People stir UP trouble, line UP for tickets, work UP an appetite, and think UPexcuses.

To be dressed is one thing, but to be dressed UPis special.

A drain must be opened UP because it is stopped UP.

We open UP a store in the morning but we close it UP at night.

We seem to be pretty mixed UP about UP!

To be knowledgeable about the proper uses of UP, look the word UP in the dictionary.

In a desk-sized dictionary, it takes UP almost 1/4th of the page and can add UP to about thirty definitions.

If you are UP to it, you might try building UP a list of the many ways UP is used.

It will take UP a lot of your time, but if you don’t give UP, you may wind UP with a hundred or more.

When it threatens to rain, we say it is clouding UP.

When the sun comes out we say it is clearing UP.

When it rains, it wets the earth and often messes things UP.

When it doesn’t rain for awhile, things dry UP.

One could go on and on, but I’ll wrap it UP,

for now my time is UP,

so…….it is time to shut UP!

Now it’s UP to you what you do with this grammatically correct trivia.

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NEXT Week’s Workshop: Developing Your Personal Marketing Plan… Thursday, June 5th, 8:45 AM @ The Egg and I Restaurant in Addison

Are you TOTALLY Prepared For an Efficient and productive job search?  This session provides an excellent, albeit quick, OVERVIEW of preparing for an efficient job search, for regulars and new comers alike.  Our focus is on effective time management to create focus and efficiency in job search efforts. We also look at the importance of personal accountability to ACTION!

We meet regularly at The Egg and I Restaurant in Addison (NW quadrant of Arapaho and Montfort… 1 block east of the Tollway)

Who Should Attend?

  1. Anyone who wants to create a strategic plan for the rest of their working life… job changes will occur!
  2. Job seekers who find themselves in a rut…rapidly crashing into the black hole of depression
  3. Any job seeker looking to create focus within their search efforts
  4. Any professional to give substance to their next steps
  5. Newcomers to DFWCareerpilot… including tire-kickers

Please SHARE this post with your friends.

THIS Week’s Workshop: In-Synch Personal Marketing Collateral Materials… Thursday, May 29th, 8:45 AM @ The Egg and I in Addison

Building on the concepts of ACHIEVING CareerFITness, next week’s Event will focus on content issues for high impact, productive collateral materials like a job seeker’s resume, verbal ‘pitches,’ and their LinkedIn Profile.

Actions requested:

Bring hard and soft copies of your current resume draft… bring your laptop (or other wi fi-enabled editing tool) if you want to do some self-inflicted, hands on editing of your resume or LinkedIn Profile… everyone will have the opportunity to practice their verbal collateral materials.

The 411…

Let’s consider the difference between good and GREAT.  Why agonize over the creation of “the perfect resume?”  You’ve seen sketch artists capture the real you in a matter of minutes… A traditional resume communicates what you have already done… sort of a historical epitaph of your past.  It is very easily written from old job descriptions.

However, Vincent van Gogh (1853-1890), a Dutch painter, was NEVER in a hurry.  A masterpiece takes time.  I have never known anyone, including professional resume writers, who are capable of developing and writing a high impact resume within an hour or two.  The upside of getting a resume out quickly is that you don’t sacrifice early opportunities.  Such a “quickie” may work well… especially if you’re seeking a commodity job in a soft job market.  You need a job fast, right???

  Wrong.

  • The downside of a “quickie resume” — when your true objective is to find work requiring professional talent and skills — is that the output is seldom very compelling and persuasive, truly fitting your career objectives.  And in today’s digital marketplace, your quickie resume may have extended shelf life, once “mined” from the giant, online resume/job banks.  It’s a monster of a problem.
  • The time that you spend developing a GREAT Resume Template is some of the most valuable time that you’ll spend while in career transition.  A “GREAT” Resume is a dynamic documentation of your communication strategy, the vital epicenter of your Personal Market Plan. 
  • Developed in parallel with your two-minute drill strategies and your LinkedIn profile, your resume will have clearly positioned and targeted marketing collateral that will serve you well.  Yes, written and verbal collaterals that are in synch with each other, will create and dispense your marketing message.

This week’s workshop encourages you to communicate what you are capable of and motivated to do in the future, using your past as supportive evidence.  Its easy to make a resume look and read well… but does YOUR resume truly “FIT” your career objectives?  By learning and following the guidelines suggested this week, you will find the “journey” to your destination, successful career transition, to be smooth sailing.  

Plan to attend this THURSDAY at 8:45 AM…

Who should attend:

  1. Job seekers who have not achieved productivity in their ONLINE efforts
  2. NEW Job seekers who need to develop their collateral ‘arsenal’
  3. Those that understand they must ‘tweak’ their resumes from time to time… but don’t understand HOW
  4. DFWCareerpilot ‘regulars’ with specific questions

THIS THURSDAY’s Workshop: Achieving CareerFIT… Thursday, May 22nd at 8:45 AM @ The Egg and I Restaurant in Addison

Just what IS a good CareerFIT for you?

To achieve a good “fit” between you and any future opportunity, you have to ask yourself some basic questions about yourself and your prospective employers. The fit depends on how well the jobs meets your needs and how well your skills and abilities meet the employer’s needs. The employer will make a decision and extend an offer to you: now it is time for you to make your decision.

SHARE THIS POST with your network… and let them know about the scheduling AND content changes at DFWCareerpilot!… THX

***

This week Thursday, May 22nd, we will focus on a strategic, more career-oriented, definition of FIT,  answering your questions and concerns at each step of the way…  My colleague, Brian Allen will co-present.  Your Careerpilot has created collateral development: resumes, correspondence, etc. as a separate topic for our next event.

This is a great place to start for new-comers as the other Core Topics will follow in sequence… THIS WEEK’s Workshop…  Achieving CareerFIT brings focus to those elusive decisions regarding positioning and targeting your efforts.

The first five steps of the 12 step process, from assessment to beginning the evolution of your LinkedIn Profile, will be discussed.

***

Write out the factors that are important to you in a job… actually write out your list.  During your career transition, learn the value of setting your offer criteria, a key element of your Personal Market Plan:

  1. Creates an objective target for your efforts ahead;
  2. Gives you a meaningful set of questions to ask during research and networking;
  3. Provides an objective way to analyze and react to offers as they occur.

To manage your career wisely has you extending the same concept.  Consider some of the factors listed below … Examine each factor through the questions listed – and then ask, “does this opportunity fit me?”

Work Requirements and Expectations: What is the next  appropriate work for you? Is the work process or project oriented?  If it’s process oriented, are the requirements and expectations clear?  What kinds of projects will you work on? Will you work on one project at a time, or multiple projects? Are the projects long term or short term? Will you work on a project long enough to see the end result? Is it important to you to be able to see the project as a whole, including the result? Or will you be content to do the work without a big picture understanding?

Work Environment: Will the work space be a source of comfort and confidence for you? How formal or informal is the environment? Hectic, fast paced? Will you have the opportunity to have flex time, or to tele-commute? How many hours a week does the employer expect you to work? Will you have the freedom to wear casual clothes? What is a typical day like at the company you are considering?  Would they allow a “trial visit” or at least a site visit?

Career Path: Is there a defined succession plan? What position(s) can you move to next? How long do new hires generally stay in the same job? How quickly do people get promoted? Are your opportunities for professional development well defined and available to you? Are mentors available?

Training and Personal Development: what kind of training will you get from the employer to do the job? What kind of training will you get to stay current in your area of interest? Are the answers to these two questions different? Does it matter to you if the answers are different?

***

Please let me know you’re planning to attend by filling out this quick RSVP… THX

NEXT WEEK’s Workshop: Embracing The OTHER Job Market… Thursday, May 15th @ 8:45 AM

Thursday, May 15th we will discuss basic philosophies of our approach to job search, overview the entire 12-step process, answering your questions and concerns at each step of the way… this is a great place to start for new-comers as the other Core Topics will follow in sequence.

Please SHARE THIS POST with your network.

A job seeker’s Personal Marketing Plan will embrace all of the 12 Steps in our job search process.  It is meant to provide a focused and efficient approach to The OTHER Job Market…  You see, the notion of an “unpublished or hidden” job market is far from new.  However, knowledge of “The OTHER” job market, and your ability to execute your Personal Market Plan in it, will create both focus and productivity in any career transition.

In every marketplace, there are buyers and sellers.  In the traditional job market, the one that our Department of Labor “analyzes,” job seekers are the sellers and their potential employers are the buyers.  The commodity is productive work and the competition is fierce.

In the OTHER Job Market, buyers and sellers hold equal responsibility for the recruitment process.  When employers have a need for someone to fulfill a specific role, often the most desired candidates are employed individuals with the credentials they seek.  Thus the employer must sell their Company to potential employees in the marketplace in order to attract the best of the lot.  Once identified, they simply select their choice and buy their services.

The traditional job market, then, could be characterized by “requisitioned” jobs being filled by chosen job seekers.

The OTHER Job Market, on the other hand, is characterized by available/needed work being fulfilled by job seekers, contractors, internal candidates, third-party consultants, retirees, part-timers, temporary workers, etc.

Who should attend…

  • Regulars. to gain new perspective
  • New Comers, come kick the tires of a new approach to job search
  • Long term job seekers looking for a new edge… a new approach

This Week’s Event: CLOSING THE DEAL-Interview Tactics…Thursday, May 8th @ 8:45 AM at The Egg and I Restaurant

Please SHARE THIS POST with your network.

Thursday, May 8th, we will focus on Interview TACTICS, including MoneySpeak and interviewingincluding a POST-Offer Negotiation Approach.  This stuff is worth your practice time in anticipation of that terrific offer you’ll get!

Who should attend?

  1. Those who want to perform more effectively in actual interviews–get to the offer!
  2. Those seeking a systematic, focused, more predictable way to conduct any interview and discussion of salary;
  3. “Regulars” who need a ‘booster shot.’… and bring a guest;
  4. New Comers and tire kickers… this is a great session with which to supplement your job search effectiveness!e meet at The Egg and I Restaurant (NW Quadrant of Arapaho and Montfort) in Addison.  Come prepared to work on YOUR most difficult or challenging interview issues.

When an offer is extended to you, you should feel prepared to respond appropriately AND consider optimizing the package offered…

A famous coach, of Green Bay Packer fame, spoke frankly when he said, “Perfect practice makes perfect.”  Mr. Lombardi’s intent was CLEAR.  He wanted his players to concentrate on PRACTICE, drilling on the “little things”, the basics, so that they became instinct during the heat of real life. Such is productive mindset during any career transition, specifically related to your ability to relate your well positioned “story” to others, answer questions effectively, conduct productive negotiations, and, in general, fine tune your personal salesmanship skills.  So what are those basics that will allow you to effectively “close the deal?”

  1. Practice your two minute drill every chance you get…. it’s the fundamental building material of your communication strategy–your verbal collaterals!
  2. Practice your exit and qualification statements… most all potential employers and networking contacts will want to know your current situation and why you are available.
  3. Practice answering both common and tough questions… including pre-offer negotiation tactics.

TOP TEN NEGOTIATION THOUGHTS…

Knowing salary administration strategy from the Corporate view, The Careerpilot is not surprised by the actual marketplace performance of today’s professionals in career transition. Even in the current “soft market” conditions, Candidates have been seeing 15% increases to be commonplace… even higher with some highly marketable Candidates or from within high demand industries and companies. You can negotiate anything. Here are my “TOP TEN TIPS” for negotiating a new salary.

  1. Research your profession’s salary range… Check with recruiters in your field, the U.S. Department of Labor’s Occupational Outlook Handbook, competitors, trade publications, your local chamber of commerce and the Internet: “salaryexpert.com” and “salary.com” are two of my favorites.
  2. Select a target salary… You may not get what you want, but having a specific objective can help you get close. Keep total “position worth” and your value proposition in mind.
  3. Prove your value with examples from actual experience.
  4. Don’t initiate salary discussions…Wait for the interviewer to bring the subject up, even if it’s postponed to a second interview. There are at least three tactical “scripts” to help you: BLOCKING, TURNAROUND and FORCING FEEDBACK.
  5. Move from “past salary history” to discussion of your “salary requirements”, they’re “negotiable.”Do the same on applications by writing “negotiable” in any box asking about salary details. If the form asks you to provide current salary, write, “to be discussed.” Your advantage is to attach salary to specific JOB, not YOU.
  6. Be prepared to state actual past salary in terms of current market conditions… but only when pressed.
  7. Discuss benefits and other negotiable items separately from salary… Your list of benefits and other negotiable items generate your total position worth or value. Your advantage is to attach salary to the specifics of the JOB, not YOU and your skills and experience.
  8. Analyze all benefit packages with an insurance, investment or bank professional, even a trusted HR professional. They can help you understand benefit language and may look at the offer more objectively.
  9. ALWAYS consider the cost of living when relocating… If it’s higher, suggest some form of balancing compensation or other offset.
  10. Always assume a firm’s first offer is negotiable, never accepting the initial offer…Rather, express your strong interest, but state you always discuss decisions of this magnitude with advisers whose judgment you have relied upon for years. Tell your interviewer when you’ll contact him or her with your decision.

By following the tips above, you’ll increase your chances of receiving a pay increase or other significant improvement to your total position worth or value. Your mindset is directed toward a “total value” increase… practice tactics to develop that confidence and “poker face.”

Remember, “He who mentions money first, usually loses.”

 

NEXT Week’s Event: CLOSING THE DEAL-Interview Tactics…Thursday, May 8th @ 8:45 AM at The Egg and I Restaurant

Thursday, May 8th, we will focus on Interview TACTICS, including MoneySpeak and interviewingincluding a POST-Offer Negotiation Approach.  This stuff is worth your practice time in anticipation of that terrific offer you’ll get!

We meet at The Egg and I Restaurant (NW Quadrant of Arapaho and Montfort) in Addison.

Come prepared to work on YOUR most difficult or challenging interview issues.

When an offer is extended to you, you should feel prepared to respond appropriately AND consider optimizing the package offered.

Who should attend?

  1. Those who want to perform more effectively in actual interviews–get to the offer!
  2. Those seeking a systematic, focused, more predictable way to conduct any interview and discussion of salary;
  3. “Regulars” who need a ‘booster shot.’… and bring a guest;
  4. New Comers and tire kickers… this is a great session with which to supplement your job search effectiveness!

Please SHARE THIS POST with your network.